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2.20.2006

Glaciers contributing to global warming


A May 2005 photo of the calving front of the Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier shows enormous calving activity. The glacier in east Greenland is now moving about 8.5 miles a year, or 126 feet per day. That's nearly three times faster than in the past.

Credit: NASA Wallops/John Sonntag



Greenland glaciers disappearing more quickly

Greenland's glaciers are dumping more than twice as much ice into the Atlantic Ocean now as 10 years ago because glaciers are sliding off the land more quickly, researchers said on Thursday.

This could mean oceans will rise even faster than forecast, and rising surface air temperatures appear to be to blame, the researchers report in Friday's issue of the journal Science.


on a related note

Scientist earmarks planets most likely to hold alien life